yourlibrarian: Duran Duran on a boat (OTH-DuranRio-jeansmx)
[personal profile] yourlibrarian
1) The Road Home by Michael Thomas Ford stopped soon after it got interesting. Read more... )

2) The Line of Beauty by Alan Hollinghurst is literary fiction rather than a romance, even though the story revolves around a gay man's relationships. For various reasons it seemed to me like a cross between Gatsby and Brideshead Revisited. Read more... )

3) Speaking of books, I found this discussion about a recent trend in thrillers marketed to women something I was ambivalent about. Read more... )

4) HT to Petzi for this news: Chevrolet is discontinuing the Chevy Impala. Looks like it will be departing at the same time as Supernatural is.

5) HT to Paula for this article about the 100 greatest movie props. Although it's a reminder to me that I'm not a big movie watcher, I liked the idea of reviewing symbols. Also, Star Wars fans may be interested to read about the creation of light sabers.Read more... )

Dear Crossovering writer or artist

Jul. 24th, 2017 04:09 pm
isis: (gryffindor sheppard)
[personal profile] isis
Dear writer or artist! Thank you for offering to create a fanwork crossing over two of these sources. As long as you generally stick with things I like and avoid things I dislike, I will love your story or artwork even if it doesn't take on any of my prompts, which are only suggestions. I am [archiveofourown.org profile] Isis on AO3.

Some general stuff about my tastes: For written works, explicit sex (slash, het, or femslash) is okay, non-explicit sex is okay, no sex is okay, but any sex should be in believable language for the source, and there should be more to the story than just PWP. If you choose to write a sex scene, I prefer those that focus on emotions and perceptions rather than on the mechanics of what goes where, and I am rather vanilla in my preferences where kink is concerned: mouths, hands, genitals, toys, all are fine, but I'm not into BSDM or bloodplay or watersports or anything that might get a special tag. Gen is a-okay with me too. For art, I prefer R-rated art to NC17-rated art, and I'm totally happy with lower-rated art.

I have made some prompts and suggestions, but feel free to take things in whatever direction you like and/or include characters I haven't mentioned. I like: historical/worldbuildy detail, scenery porn, non-explicitly-detailed sex, ghost stories, supernatural elements, what-if AUs, original characters. My favorite tropes are time travel, bodyswap, and afterlife stories, though I'm perfectly happy with an entirely canonical scenario. In general I'm not a fan of AU that completely changes the setting, but if you have a brilliant idea, go for it; I would prefer "interesting" to "mundane" AUs, e.g., in SPAAAACE yes, coffeeshop no. (Coffeeshop in SPAAAACE, okay!). Except as noted, I would like happy endings and no major character death (unless it's canonical and results in ghost-fic).

For fic, I generally prefer plot (as in, things happening; doesn't have to be elaborate or long – as contrasted with character studies), past tense (either first person or third person – I don't like second person), and lots of dialogue. But these are preferences, not hard DNWs, and if you have a brilliant idea that requires second person or present tense, go ahead. My only hard preferences are for conventional pronouns, capitalization, and punctuation.

For art, I am happier with AU than in fic. I am totally fine with simple portraits, though if you want to show characters interacting, I have a soft spot for art in which one character is doing something typical-but-alarming, and the other is rolling his or her eyes, or reacting with horror, or getting ready to douse them with a bucket of water, or whatever. I like line drawings as well as full color. Stylistically, I love interesting and experimental compositions, unusual perspectives, emphasis on textures such as hair and clothing, and scenery porn (Mountains! Trees! Cliffs with water crashing on them! Brooding ruins of an ancient castle!)

This is a placeholder and will be edited to add specific fandom likes and prompts. )

Challenge No 3: 99 words

Jul. 24th, 2017 06:33 pm
smallhobbit: (Default)
[personal profile] smallhobbit
Debriswoman recommended You have breath for no more than 99 words.  What would they be? collected by Liz Gray, and suggested this as a writing challenge.  So this month I have been writing 99 words for some of my characters.

It quickly became apparent the characters I would write had to be those for who I have written series, so that I could really get inside their heads.  I frequently write say, John Watson, both in BBC Sherlock and ACD Sherlock Holmes, but each time there may be subtle differences.  Whereas taking the Watson in Sussex Retirement I had a far greater idea of how he would think.  This also served to narrow down the characters I would choose.

I had decided to include the gang from the Marylebone Monthly Illustrated really as a bit of light relief.  Only when I came to write the first of them, the Ocelot, I came across the Editor with very strong views, and found myself writing one of the most dour of the entries.

None of the characters explicitely contradict my own views.  This might be a fault in a writer, but I think if I'm investing the time in a character to write a series then I want to be in agreement with them.  This is, after all, a hobby rather than a career.

The last chapter, which I have just posted, is my own 99 words, for I felt it was appropriate to leave a little bit of myself there too.

It's been a fascinating challenge, nothing like I expected when I started, and totally worthwhile doing, so thank you Debriswoman

99 words

Richard III

Jul. 22nd, 2017 01:47 pm
smallhobbit: (Default)
[personal profile] smallhobbit
I wouldn't normally see two different productions of the same play within the space of two months - inevitably the two will be compared, and anyway there are lots of other plays out there.  But on this occasion it was inevitable.  I had already booked to see Greg Hicks when Antic Disposition announced their new tour.  We really enjoyed their production of Henry V last year, and I would have looked at seeing them again anyway, but since they were once more in Gloucester Cathedral I had to go.

The play was performed in the choir and right at the edge of the presbytery - the doors at either end providing entrances.  There was very little in the way of props, two thrones at one end, some boxes to give added height occasionally at the other, but their absence didn't matter.  Again it was in modern dress, suits for the most part, formal army dress for Richard on his coronation, battle dress for the battle.  The parts of the two young princes were played by two of the female actors, who also played two of the queens, so smart outfits as queens, torn jeans as princes.

Richard, played by Toby Manley, was excellent as the manipulative future king.  At one point, after his wooing of Anne he turned round smiling broadly at the audience.  I was smiling broadly too and he grinned at me.  We were sitting in the front seats of the choir.

There was plenty of engagement with the audience.  In anticipation of the young Prince Edward's arrival in London, Catesby handed out flags to wave.  I was slightly disappointed SM was given one and I wasn't - but he waved his furiously at the right moment.

One of the things I particularly liked was that as the various characters were killed they would take their place at one end of the space as silent witnesses to the following action.  The characters alternated, so it didn't become overcrowded, but I felt it was particularly effective.

Apart from the young princes, there were a number of other actors who had two roles, but it wasn't noticeable and without looking at the programme I wouldn't have been aware of who was who.  In particular one actor played both Rivers and Richmond and I would never have realised.

It was a really good production, very different from the last one I'd seen, and one I'd recommend.

Gloucester Cathedral )
It's taken from the Organ Loft.  We were sat about half way down at the front on the right.

Recs. Non-Recs and Nostalgia

Jul. 21st, 2017 01:20 pm
yourlibrarian: Impala on the road (SPN-OntheRoad-leeloo3)
[personal profile] yourlibrarian
1) Late Goodbye by SecretlytoDream is a melancholy look at all the people the Winchesters have met and lost through their journey. But it has a hopeful ending.Read more... )

2) I know a number of people on my flist loved Sense8, so here's a celebratory vid to check out.

3) One of my favorite responses to the backlash surrounding the 13th Doctor Who.

4) A whistleblower is trying to get the Trump administration investigated for its reassignment of environmental staff at taxpayer expense to jobs they're unqualified for just to keep them from working on climate change matters. This includes addressing the disappearance of Alaskan villages into the sea.

5) We've been recording Battle of the Network Stars and while it's nothing I'd recommend to anyone, we've been finding it easy viewing during meals when Daily Show or Colbert aren't available. It has wisely, I think, chosen nostalgia as its calling card. Read more... )
smallhobbit: (Guy)
[personal profile] smallhobbit
The more astute among you will possibly realise I rather like Richard Armitage.  Even the guy at work who transferred all my phone details to my new phone probably knows this, although he may not realise who it is.

So, recently RA did the voice for one of the characters on Castlevania, an anime of a computer game thingy on Netflix.  I do not like anime, I don't play computer games and I don't have Netflix.  But ...  It turned out with Netflix you get a one month free trial before having to start paying - so there was nothing lost.  And there were only four episodes of about 20-25 minutes each, which meant I could space them out nicely over four days.  Or in fact, watch all four in an evening.  Much to my surprise I enjoyed it, and am now looking forward to the new season next year.  Yes, there is a lot of swearing, and blood and gore (but if I can sit in the front row for Titus Andronicus I can cope), but in fact it was fun.

RA has also been in a film called Pilgrimage.  At first I wasn't going to watch it (lots more violence and unpleasantness) but the premise sounded interesting, and the question of the role of religion in the lives of the people is one I'm interested in.  So, when [personal profile] vix_spes  said she'd got a copy of the DVD for £7 from Sainsbury's I nipped into one on my way to work - and it went through the till for a fiver.  It's an interesting film, which I might watch again.  A proportion of the film is in Irish or French, and the subtitles weren't very easy to see - or at least not from my position behind the ironing board (no guilt whatsoever to watching a DVD during the day if I'm doing the ironing!) but I was taken with it.  And not just because of Raymond de Merville.

And I'm still waiting for Berlin Station to make it to Netflix UK!

Free TV

Jul. 18th, 2017 05:13 pm
yourlibrarian: Cheerful Willow (BUF-CheerfulWillow-all_at_once)
[personal profile] yourlibrarian
1) Thanks to the free HBO week, I was able to finish seeing Elizabeth I with Helen Mirren, Jeremy Irons and Hugh Dancy. I was curious about how that project was developed because it seemed like they wanted to apply Shakespeare to her monarchy, which makes a good bit of sense. It was certainly quite the mix of personal and political problems, usually with the first becoming the second. It was also a rare case of an affair between an older woman and young man on TV.

2) The Casual Vacancy was also on the list. Read more... )

3) We also watched Westworld. In fact, I'd started watching it on my own but Mike got so interested in the bits he caught that we rewatched the episodes I'd already seen so he could catch up.Read more... )

4) As one could say this about more shows than not, the L.A. Weekly had a really interesting (if disturbing) story about the history of portraying sexual assault in film and TV and how poorly it's been approached for the sake of actors and crew.

"Still, that a director would brag about raping his co-star to publicize a film is mind-boggling. That critics don't seem to care is worse."

5) HT to Petzi for this link about TV cliffhangers. To this I would argue that TV programming is not movies -- it is by definition open ended, serialized. Even when hardly any shows had seriality there was still a certain continuity to it in terms of characters, certain past events, the premise. There was always the sense that something was not the end. Read more... )

The Book Review Post

Jul. 17th, 2017 04:50 pm
yourlibrarian: IHasCoupon-misty_creates (SPN-IHasCoupon-misty_creates)
[personal profile] yourlibrarian
1) Now and Then by Stephen Grecco. Read more... )

2) Breakaway by Avon Gale was a slow starter for me. Read more... )

3) I've read a few books by Josh Lanyon before and thought they were only ok. But I love mysteries and there's a limit to how many gay romance mysteries there are out there. So I gave another book a try, Fair Game. I quite liked this one and stayed up late to finish it! Read more... )

4) I was less thrilled with Snapdragon by Michelle Woody. Read more... )

5) I had liked Louise Penny's "Still Life" mystery, a gift from a friend. I tried out the second book, The Cruelest Month, and quite enjoyed it, although it certainly wasn't short on plot. Read more... )

smallhobbit: (Thorin)
[personal profile] smallhobbit
I took part in the Multi-Fandom Drabble Exchange on AO3, which was great fun.  It worked on the same basis as any exchange, with the ficlets all being drabbles.  So nice and quick, with the possibility of writing treats and generally enjoying yourself.

I was very fortunate in receiving one gift and three treats.  One of my requests had been for The Hobbit, Thorin Oakenshield/Bilbo Baggins, and I received my gift Growing Things, plus two treats, For You and Gems of the Garden.  In addition I received Heatwave, a Forever treat.

I wrote a Life on Mars drabble Beware of Gene Bearing Drinks and a Call The Midwife pinch hit Speak Through the Earthquake, Wind and Fire.  And then two treats, an anthropomorfic knitting drabble Fair Isle and another Call the Midwife drabble Learning from the Television.

The Drabble Exchange was new for me, but I've also recently taken part again in Not Prime Time, which is an exchange for medium sized fandoms, which are too big for Yuletide, but don't tend to have their own exchanges.

I received a Forever fic as a gift, Acts of Kindness and unaware of it managed to write a treat for my author in the same fandom: Abe's Bet.  My own assignment was once more Call the Midwife, Even on Holiday.  And lastly there was an irresistible Spooks Adam Carter/Lucas North prompt, which produced Under Surveillance.  I chose to write a slightly different take on Adam and Lucas first working together, although somehow the final outcome may be similar.

drabblemania! And other festathons!

Jul. 17th, 2017 11:50 am
isis: Write what you're told! (micah wright)
[personal profile] isis
The second annual Multifandom Drabble Exchange ([community profile] multifandomdrabble) went live yesterday, and I received a gift and a treat:

Summer turns towards Autumn by [archiveofourown.org profile] weakinteraction - The Man in the High Castle (TV), Tagomi and Juliana post-S2. I do wonder what is going to happen in S3 when they eventually meet again, and this is a lovely teaser!

The Visitor by [archiveofourown.org profile] Alona - The Divine Cities series by Robert Jackson Bennett, Mulaghesh gen. I prompted "accidental kitten acquisition" and this made me smile because it's so in character.

I was assigned to write for [archiveofourown.org profile] st_aurafina:

A New Hobby - Lord John series by Diana Gabaldon, Lord John/Stephan von Namtzen (okay, it's really gen, but) in a stealth fusion with an undisclosed fandom. Lord John Grey visits Waldesruh again, and learns about Stephan von Namtzen's latest obsession.

I also wrote a bunch of treats (all G-rated):

Saucy Wench - Hot Sauces (Anthropomorphic), Cholula/ Tapatío - There's a new girl on the shelf.

My Sin - due South (TV), Frannie Vecchio/Maggie McKenzie - Licking the evidence runs in the family.

Fire - Frontier Wolf by Rosemary Sutcliff, Teleri(/Connla) - Everyone in the village said they should wed, with their matching crowns of fiery hair.

The Bicycle Rule - The Giver by Lois Lowry, The Receiver gen - It was one of the few rules that was not taken very seriously and was almost always broken. (The Giver, chapter 2.)

One More Earthly Pleasure - The Witcher 3 videogame (actually for the DLC Hearts of Stone), Shani and Vlodimir - In which Gaunter O'Dimm doesn't banish Vlodimir at midnight.

Aboard the Psi-Ship Foxway - The Raven Cycle by Maggie Stiefvater, gen - 300 Fox Way IN SPAAACE.

Here are links to the main collection and the treats - a lot of tasty bite-sized fandom bits to sample. My favorite so far unfortunately points up the problem with drabbles - that they are so tiny and can only tell a very limited story - because it's a drabble sequence and therefore encompasses a lot more story than a single 100-word chunk can tell. But it's really amazing:

Forward/Back (500 words) by lalalalalawhy
Fandom: Original Work
Rating: Teen And Up Audiences
Warnings: No Archive Warnings Apply
Relationships: Time Traveler/Time Traveler
Characters: Time traveling OCs, Original Female Character(s)
Additional Tags: Time Travel, Drabble, Drabble Sequence
Summary:
I skip through time like a flat stone on a still lake, spending days here, a few hours there, always moving forward. My love is the same, but reverse. Her lake is a mirror of mine. She only ever goes back.
A love story in five drabbles.

In other festathon news, I'm planning on signing up for both [community profile] crossovering and [community profile] remixrevival, which are both open for sign-ups now! Check 'em out!

FFM 2017: Part 2

Jul. 16th, 2017 09:45 pm
scfrankles: knight on horseback with lance lowered (Default)
[personal profile] scfrankles
I'm currently taking part in Flash Fiction Month over on DeviantArt, writing and posting a story of 55 to 1,000 words each day of July.

Here are links to the next batch if anyone's interested in taking a look:


Relaxing Clover attempts to relax at the Halcyon Spa. It's harder than she expected.

Tired After a cursed sleep of a hundred years, Princess Briar Rose does not wake up refreshed.

Grimm Times in the West A short Fairy Tale/Western crossover - told in reverse.

Word Play All the words in a play's script go on strike.

Stuffed My attempt at a psychological thriller. But though you can take the girl out of the comedy, it appears you can't take all the comedy out of the girl...

Victorian Humour An elderly pun looks back on his Victorian heyday.

Kids That Go Bump in the Night A collaboration written with the excellent writer ilyilaice. A kind of... non-film-noir film noir story - with two ten-year-old girl detectives.

The Hero's Return, Part Two Albert Braithwaite's cousin Robert comes to stay.


Or you can find all my stories so far grouped together here.


Author's Pick: Tired!

What drew me to Brownies?

Jul. 14th, 2017 01:11 pm
smallhobbit: (screech owl)
[personal profile] smallhobbit
Faithful readers of this blog will know that sometime last month I asked if anyone wanted to ask me something.  Most of you already know far more about me than is strictly necessary, but [personal profile] aome  asked how I got involved with Brownies in the first place.

The simple answer, which is probably the same for three-quarters of leaders, is because the daughter's Guide Unit needed help.  But there's more to why I'm still involved.

To begin at the very beginning:  The daughter was always a very enthusiastic guiding member.  She began Rainbows a little above the minimum age, but the first time she went she came home asking if I could sponsor her, could she go to an event, and when did she get her uniform.  When she moved onto Brownies she had the option of joining two trips at the end of the summer term, or waiting until the autumn - there was no question, she was going on the trips.  And so onto Guides - one week there and she's signed up for camp the following month.

So when her unit were in desperate need of help, I wanted to make sure she could continue with something she enjoyed.  I started as a Unit Helper, but was persuaded to take the qualification and become an Assistant Leader.  And inevitably the leader moved with her husband, and I took the final part of the qualification to become the Unit Leader.  The daughter got older and moved onto Explorer Scouts.

Time passed, and my Assistant Leader could no longer help.  The daughter took GCSEs and started college, where she was residential.  We needed to pay for the accommodation which meant I needed to find a full-time job (I had worked part-time whilst the kids were growing up.)  So with less time and less help I did one further term as Unit Leader, but then was forced to close the unit.

I still wanted to do 'something' and having had involvement with the Scouts whilst the daughter was there, I went to help with a Beaver Scout unit.  It turned out that Scouting wasn't for me.  So after a couple of terms I stopped.

And enquired at the village Brownie pack whether I could be of assistance.  I knew the leaders from my time with the Guides, and had helped them with the annual London trip and on other odd occasions.  Strangely enough, it turned out that an experienced pair of hands would be very welcome.  So I completed the group specific part of the qualification, so I could lead Brownies.  Then, when one of the Brownie leaders proposed starting a new Guide Unit in the nearby town I offered to help and provide experience of the Guide programme.  So for two terms I was doing both Brownies and Guides.  (By that point I had changed job again and was working slightly less hours).

Then, when we moved to Gloucester, I asked one of my current Brownie Leaders if she knew a pack I could join.  She recommended the one I'm at now, which was ideal because it suited my style of leadership.  So, 14 years later, I'm still involved as a Brownie leader.

17776

Jul. 13th, 2017 02:19 pm
isis: (lego draco)
[personal profile] isis
I followed a rec from [personal profile] vass in a comment to a post at [personal profile] jamethiel and hply sjot, I have fallen down a rabbit hole! I had seen references to 17776 at ffa but ignored them, because once I realized it wasn't a typo for the musical it turned out to be a multimedia web thingy about football, which is not something I'm interested in.

But it's not about football. Well, I suppose it is, on some level, but it's Calvinball-football, something called football that has one toe still in the contemporary game but "now", in the far far post-quasi-apocalyptic future, is mostly an outrageously inventive pastime for bored immortals, which we are shown through commentary by old spacecraft which have now achieved sentience, including one who has just "awoken" and so has to have everything explained to it by the others.

It is a WIP, apparently updated daily. I am not sure how much is out or how far along I am, but I just finished the Page, Arizona chapter, in which opposing teams become trapped in a canyon with sheer walls and continue battling for thousands of years. (I have been there in real life! I am amused!)

Anyway, if this description intrigues you: https://www.sbnation.com/a/17776-football/

wednesday reads 'n things

Jul. 12th, 2017 04:31 pm
isis: winged Isis image (wings)
[personal profile] isis
What I've recently finished reading:

Assassin's Fate by Robin Hobb - I liked the story, appreciated the way the ending called back to other elements of the series (and felt it a solid, satisfying ending), but I am not sure why this book didn't resonate emotionally with me. Perhaps it's because having read the series over such a long span of time, the characters' lives are less fresh and compelling to me. Perhaps it's because this book's ambitious scope in tying together not just the final trilogy but all the Realms of the Elderlings sub-series required so many sub-plots that it seemed an overwhelming brick with too many diversions. I enjoyed reading it, as I enjoyed most of the series (Rain Wilds, ugh) but toward the end I was feeling as though it was more a chore than a delight, and I'm glad I'm finished.

The Magpie Lord by K. J. Charles - Better than the average m/m novel, but that's a low bar. The magic is interesting (and the best part of the book); the plotting is pretty good, though the ending is a bit abrupt, with a sudden influx of new characters whose villainy could have been set up better through the narrative; the romance is all right, though a bit too heavy on the size-difference kink for my taste. I'm not particularly inclined to seek out the rest of the series, though I have to say I'm intrigued by Stephen's partner Esther, who was mentioned but didn't actually appear in the story.

Dungeons & Dreamers: A Story of how Computer Games Created a Global Community by Brad King and John Borland - This readable, engaging book traces the development of multi-user computer games and non-game shared social spaces (such as Second Life) from their roots in tabletop gaming and D&D, through text adventure and then graphic action/adventure games, to current (as of writing, which is not current at all) massively networked games. I found the early chapters particularly interesting because I, too, was a D&D geek and gamer in the late 70s/early 80s (though I drifted away after early graphical games such as Spacewar, and text games Zork and Advent and their progeny); it was like reading the book equivalent of the TV series Halt and Catch Fire, the underlying stories of things which I experienced as a casual user at the time.

There is certainly more focus on certain people and game companies than others, but this doesn't purport to be a complete history of games and gaming. Instead this focus (which wavers at times, admittedly) serves to build the thesis that (most) people like narrative and social interactions, even while killing monsters. I think it's a reasonable view, though perhaps it leaves out the meta aspect of people who like to play single-player games (which I imagine are the majority of games available) but who then congregate on Reddit and other forums to share their experiences and screenshots. Anyway, recommended if you have an interest in this sort of thing.

What I'm reading now:

Right now I'm down to my audiobook, Plus One by Elizabeth Fama, which I am a little more than halfway through. I'm finding it surprisingly interesting and enjoyable for YA dystopian SF. I mentioned last week that I thought I'd read a short story with a similar premise, of people split into night people and day people, and while browsing the Goodreads reviews I saw one person mention that it was sort of based on a book called The Day Boy and the Night Girl, which is an 1882 fairy tale novel by George MacDonald. I checked it out on Wikipedia and while it sounds interesting, it's not the story I was thinking of.

What I'm reading next:

I might have to read the fourth Expanse book, because B keeps blathering about the books while we watch the show. He also has been reading the Wayward Pines books and thinks I should read them. (The author is a friend of a friend.) I have some various random stuff in ebook I ought to read sometime, things I've downloaded through Instafreebie (though so far I have not been impressed), through the Tor free ebook series, and through other promotions.

What I'm watching now:

We are 6/10 through S2 of The Expanse! It is weird to me how the TV seasons don't match up with the books very well. The things I think of as being the important stuff that happened in the second book have not even occurred yet (well, one of them finally did in E6). What a pretty show, though.

What I'm watching next:

I heard a rumor that Winter is Coming. Huh, looks like summer to me.

Friends to Lovers?

Jul. 12th, 2017 08:32 pm
smallhobbit: (Lestrade trio)
[personal profile] smallhobbit
I was discussing this theme on Twitter with [personal profile] loz  and said I had sufficient thoughts that I would write a blog post.  And then promptly didn't - in part because that was the day I then went to see Titus Andronicus, which isn't condusive to such thoughts.  But now it's come up again as the Trope for the Day on [community profile] ushobwri  and [personal profile] brumeier  has asked for our thoughts.  So no escape.

It's not a trope I'm that keen on, partly because two of the fandoms I belong to seem desperate to make it happen.  Yes, one is Sherlock (principally the BBC version) and also Lewis.  If that's the way you like things that's fine, I'm not saying it's wrong at all, just that it doesn't appeal to me.  I have come across too many fics where the writer has contrived to bring the two together and suddenly it's wonderful.  There are times when remaining as friends would be perfectly acceptable.

So where does that leave me, and my most written pairings?  Which isn't to say I don't write other pairings for gift fics or for friends, but here I'm concentrating on my favourites.

My first fandom was Life on Mars - the UK version.  And the classic Sam/Gene.  They snark, they argue, they get to know each other better, and the relationship begins.  Now it may be my age, or my outlook, but I don't see that the relationship has to immediately include sex, but this is more than just friends.

Onto BBC's Sherlock.  I don't see Sherlock/John.  John/Greg yes - they see each other in a professional context and realise they want to get to know each other better.  For me it's fairly quick.  I'm currently not writing this pairing.  Sherlock/Stanley Hopkins - again a professional interest moves on to something deeper quite quickly - of course, this is Hopkins of the Met River Police, entirely my own creation based on ACD's Hopkins.

ACD Sherlock Holmes - Nothing will ever take Mary Morstan/John Watson away from me.  This post-hiatus Holmes/Watson is one of my few real friends to lovers, but as the relationship is described only in the Sussex Retirement 'verse it all happened in the past, so doesn't really count as a trope.  Watson reflects on the relationship in the first in the series A Quiet Retirement.

So to Lewis.  I liked Laura Hobson/Robbie Lewis, until the series seemed to spoil it for me.  In Oxford Tales I have Lewis and Hathaway working together and then moving in together, but there's never any description of how it happens.

Two of my other fandoms are both rare pairs.  Adam Carter/Lucas North in Spooks - there's a spark between them from early on, it takes time to catch light because Lucas is mentally scarred, but it's more slow burn than friends to lovers (some might say I'm being pedantic, but they both know what's happening).  And Guy/Much in Robin Hood (BBC) - in my world there's an instant attraction, and since I'm the only one who writes it, I can claim it's the only interpretation ;)

So no, as a trope friends to lovers doesn't particularly appeal.  Friday's Trope of the Day on [community profile] ushobwri  is Established Relationships and I shall be sharing my thoughts there ;)

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